Summer VISTA Associates

Katrina Henderson

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Tell us about yourself and your family

I grew up in the Cleveland area, and I recently graduated from the Ohio State University. My younger sister, Ashley, also attends OSU, and she is a pre-pharmacy student. My dad is a Quality Assurance Manager, and my mom is a Registered Nurse. We also have an energetic rescue dog named Ava.


Education background

I graduated from the Ohio State University in May 2018 with a B.S. in Neuroscience and minor in Spanish. During my undergraduate years, I was involved in social psychology research. Additionally, I was the president of Buckeyes Raising Awareness in Neuroscience. I love volunteering, and I was a member of several other service groups including the Mount Leadership Society Scholars Program, and Honors & Scholars Pen Pals. This fall, I will be starting medical school at Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine!

Career path

I hope to continue to serve patients in underserved areas as a future physician. Additionally, I aspire to have a dynamic career as a physician that will include many different roles, such as leadership and teaching opportunities, which will help shape the future of medicine.


How you came to be at the clinic

I started volunteering at the clinic during my freshman year of college with AED, a pre-medical student organization. I loved the opportunity to really make a difference in our community and communicate with some patients in Spanish. This summer I had an amazing opportunity to work at Physicians CareConnection as an AmeriCorps VISTA and serve the patients in our community full-time!


A story that you want to share that had an impact on your education/career/clinic path

When I first volunteered at the clinic I was surprised that many of our patients spoke Spanish as their primary language, and I was excited to put my Spanish interpretation skills to good use. However, I quickly realized that I needed to improve my Spanish-speaking skills if I wanted to interpret for patients at the free clinic. This experience inspired me to pursue a minor in Spanish, so I could better communicate with the Spanish-speaking patients at the clinic.



Christianna Barnard
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Tell us about yourself and your family

My family lives in Pittsburgh, PA and consists of my two sisters (one older, one younger), my parents (my mom is a choir director and my dad is a biochemist), our rescue dog, Jack, and me. I’ve lived in New York City for the past two years, but I recently relocated to Columbus, OH to be closer to my partner, Nick, who is working on his PhD in English at OSU.


Education background

I graduated with my Master of Arts in Women’s History from Sarah Lawrence College in May, where I researched the class politics of reproductive health policy in modern US history. I also worked with my college’s Institutional Review Board and did activist work focused on women’s health and public policy.

Career path

I have held a number of colorful jobs in the past, ranging from professional chorister to oral history research assistant. During graduate school, I realized that my career had to involve three things: research opportunities, a social justice focus, and a collaborative atmosphere. I’m thrilled to have found all three PCC, where I will be working as an office coordinator after I finish my VISTA term of service!


How you came to be at the clinic

I became connected with PCC through the Americorps VISTA program. While researching for my master’s thesis, I became increasingly interested in the ways that class, race, and citizenship affect access to healthcare, particularly for women. I knew I wanted to spend the summer after graduating working with an organization that addressed these disparities, and I was immediately drawn to PCC’s mission and model for providing comprehensive, accessible healthcare.


A story that you want to share that had an impact on your education/career/clinic path

I will admit that, when I started work at PCC, I worried I wouldn’t fit in. Unlike most of the volunteers and employees, I don’t have a background in medicine or healthcare; I spent the first week frantically googling terminology. But early on in my term of service, the full PCC staff met together to do team building around Galllup’s Strengthsfinder program. With Audrey, Isi, and the rest of the admin team, we found ways for me to use my love of research and information collecting to keep the rest of the staff updated on changes in health policy that affect our patient population. This spirit of open-mindedness and respect for one another is a constant in the staff, and I can see the difference that it makes both in the office and at the clinic.